PAST

BY ITSELF

3 April 2008 - 11 May 2008

A series of one week, one artist, one work exhibitions.

DAVID SPERO 3 – 6 April
LOIS ROWE 10 – 13 April
IAN WHITTLESEA 17 – 20 April
VALENTIN HAURI 24 – 27 April
SALVATORE ARANCIO 1 – 4 May
PHILOMENE PIRECKI 8 – 11 May

"It would be good if little places could be set up all over the country, like a little chapel where the traveller, or wanderer, could come for an hour to meditate on a single painting hung in a small room, and by itself." - Rothko

When the focus is on a single task, whether painting a wall, hanging a picture or arranging a vase of flowers, there is a moment of standing back to appraise what is there. That moment of seeing something fresh and new is surprisingly rare. How often do we spend time looking at a single object? Can it hold our gaze? Can we hold our gaze? How does the object, how do we, change through continued acquaintance? Is one object enough to hold the space?

The invitation to show one work is a provocation, asking each artist to concentrate his or her practice into a single statement, to consider what actually constitutes a ‘single’ work, and how it relates to the viewer, to space and time.

‘By Itself’ might be thought of as a series of solo exhibitions but also as a sequence or a path through different media and sensibilities. It is up to the viewer to encounter these works like Rothko’s ‘wanderer’ and to discover whether or not they inform each other.

DAVID SPERO’s photographs document the settlements of sustainable communities. Spero’s images not only convey a way of life, they have an almost other-worldly quality, whilst also describing the simplicity and craft inherent in these unique relationships with nature.

LOIS ROWE unfolds shifting landscapes in her films. We are guided by a narrator whose discourse at once uncovers a dynamic world and in turn becomes another layer of fiction.

IAN WHITTLESEA creates textual works from meticulously constructed paintings to fold-out posters. Each text whether a poetic aphorism, a series of names or a studio address, create a potent biographical snapshot.

VALENTIN HAURI’s paintings hover somewhere between abstraction and representation. Travels and experiences as well as references to music and literature all feed into the rich texture of Hauri’s works.

SALVATORE ARANCIO explores fantastical, sublime landscapes in a method reminiscent of 19th century botanical illustration. Arancio’s scenes appear almost mythical and their construction is shrouded in ambiguity.

PHILOMENE PIRECKI focuses on the characteristics of language in her work. She investigates the alphabet not only as a sequence of structures and signs but also as an animated dance of abstract shapes.

The exhibition is curated for ROOM by Tamsin Clark.